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What are the Different Types of Walkway Molds?

Dan Cavallari
By
Updated Jan 31, 2024
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Walkway molds made from plastic or metal can make creating a distinctive and useful walkway easy and quick. Molds come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and the finished product can be made to mimic cobblestone, brick, stone, or other custom shapes that are more decorative. Some walkway molds can even be custom-made to fit a builder's specifications, though these are more expensive. Concrete is poured into the walkway molds to form the specific shapes outlined by the molds, and the color of the concrete can be changed with iron oxide pigments. This allows the concrete to mimic the color of brick, or other custom colors.

The most common walkway molds are made to form the shape of cobblestones, though not always necessarily evenly shaped cobblestones. The size and shape of the cobbles varies depending on the mold, and a buyer has a fair amount of choices for the particular application of the mold. A wider, longer walkway might benefit from larger cobbles, while a smaller walkway might look better with smaller, rectangular cobbles. The aesthetic is entirely up to the builder, and plenty of molds exist from which to choose.

Some walkway molds are meant to mimic the shape of a brick pathway. The molds are set out in a grid pattern meant to look like laid bricks, and by adding an iron oxide pigment to the concrete, the finished product will look very much like actual bricks. The texture may be different, however, so the builder may have to spend a bit of time modifying the look of the concrete before it sets. Other walkway molds are meant to mimic the look of rough stones, so the shapes are uneven and the surface of the stones can also be made to look and feel uneven. Such a mold is often used for garden pathways to complement the raw, earth-like look of the garden.

Other molds can be made to look more ornate. The finished, set concrete can be made to look like specific patterns or designs, from birds to Celtic knots or any other design the maker chooses. Custom molds can also be purchased to fit a specific pattern the homeowner or builder chooses. If the homeowner is particularly enterprising, he or she can make his or her own molds to fit a specific pattern or shape. Store-bought molds are usually made from plastic, but custom molds can be made from wood or metal to make fashioning one much easier.

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Dan Cavallari
By Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By andee — On Dec 22, 2011

I never realized how many choices of brick walkway designs there were until I started planning a garden walkway.

I have always loved a cobblestone look, and thought this would be a great do-it-yourself project.

The only thing I would suggest is to make sure you know how deep the mold is before buying it. Some of them are much deeper than I wanted, and it took me awhile to find exactly what I was looking for.

I realize the deeper the mold, the sturdier it will be, but I was looking for a slightly smaller cobblestone look. You will also need less concrete if you go with a shallower mold.

I know it is not real cobblestone, but I would not hesitate to use walkway concrete molds for other projects in the future.

By myharley — On Dec 22, 2011

@sunshined - If you are familiar with using concrete, you already know how to do the most difficult part.

Neither my husband or I had any experience using concrete before we bought some concrete walkway molds.

Between asking a lot of questions at the store and watching videos online, we thought it would be pretty easy.

We installed a walkway under an arbor that led to a small pond. The molds we bought worked really well, and the process went quicker than I thought it would.

The concrete set fast enough that we didn't have to wait too long before setting the next mold. We used the same mold over and over again and even when we were done, it isn't in bad shape.

If we wanted to do another walkway the same length, I think the molds we purchased would work just as well the second time around.

By sunshined — On Dec 21, 2011

I am in the process of landscaping our back yard, and have 2 small areas where I would like to have a walkway with stepping stones.

These walkway molds sound like something that would work perfectly. I plan on doing most of the work myself because I don't have a big budget to work with.

I am somewhat familiar with concrete work, so don't think I would have any trouble using these molds.

I am just wondering how well they hold up? Would I need to purchase several of these molds, or would one last me for the entire project?

Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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