What are Devil Sticks?

Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen
Man with hands on his hips
Man with hands on his hips

Devil sticks are types of juggling sticks that consist of two side sticks, and a middle stick manipulated by the side sticks. The center devil stick may be weighted, or have a soft end. It is usually never held, and gains its momentum from the careful movement of the side sticks.

A juggler using devil sticks can be quite impressive, as he or she works the middle stick. Modern jugglers may use middle sticks with multiple decorations or with fringed or tasseled ends. Most eye-catching are devil sticks used where the two ends of the middle stick are on fire. The middle stick can be thrown, caught, twirled, come perilously close to the juggler, or be manipulated from side to side, depending upon the juggler’s proficiency.

Sometimes juggling acts use multiple jugglers with devil sticks. Jugglers may use one middle stick and pass it back and forth, or they may use several sticks and throw them to one another with astonishing speed.

Devil sticks enjoy an ancient history in the world of juggling. Evidence of this form of juggling exists in drawings on Egyptian tombs. Current thought is that juggling with devil sticks may have first been based in Africa, and then perhaps progressed to India and China on the Silk Road.

Origin of the name devil sticks is a little bit harder to determine. Devil sticks can also be called flower sticks, perhaps due to the tassels on the end of the middle sticks, Crystal sticks, or they may sometimes be called by a registered or patented name like Lunastix®.

One can find tutorials and demonstrations of juggling with devil sticks on many Internet sites. There are also a number of books and DVDs that can help one master the basics of this form of juggling. Some community centers or gymnastics groups may also offer classes in juggling, which can cover work with devil sticks.

Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen

Tricia has a Literature degree from Sonoma State University and has been a frequent contributor for many years. She is especially passionate about reading and writing, although her other interests include medicine, art, film, history, politics, ethics, and religion. Tricia lives in Northern California and is currently working on her first novel.

Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen

Tricia has a Literature degree from Sonoma State University and has been a frequent contributor for many years. She is especially passionate about reading and writing, although her other interests include medicine, art, film, history, politics, ethics, and religion. Tricia lives in Northern California and is currently working on her first novel.

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Discussion Comments

anon1004188

The history part is as close to being wrong as it gets. There are no drawings of devilsticks on egypt tombs, this is a rumour that spread in early american flowerstick community confusing it with the painting of egypt female ball jugglers which actualy exist in the benji-hasan tombs. There is no evidence at all for an african origin. It´s likely not ancient as the first verified mention is from 1750 in China...

anon335596

Devil sticks are lots of fun!

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      Man with hands on his hips